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Employment law firms in London

Have you suffered from discrimination in the workplace and seeking advice from suitable employment law firms in London? Look no further because Damian McCarthy are the employment law specialists that can help. With up to 20 years of valuable experience in dealing with cases of all sizes, we always provide an extremely high standard of service and pride ourselves on our superb record in representing our clients.

Looking at employment firms in London and choosing the right one can be a difficult task, as we know. The first and most important step on the road to justice is appointing the right lawyer. Many people fall at this first hurdle and will end up spending far too much money on someone who simply is not passionate about winning your case and lacks the experience to do so. If for one reason or another we cannot represent you then we will always point you in the direction of reliable and professional employment law firms in London.

Seeking employment law firms in London can be the result of a wide range of issues that you have experienced in the workplace such as whistle-blowing, discrimination, unfair dismissal, stress, bullying or harassment of any form. If you are looking for employment law firms in London who will value your interests above all else and will be totally committed to your case, then we are the employment law firm in London for you.

Our lawyers have been hired by some of the biggest law firms in the UK to represent their clients and within our 20 years of experience we have established a reputation as a tough, yet effective employment law advocate. Damian McCarthy are an honest law firm, and we mean it when we say that our sole concerns are your best interests rather than ours. We will prove that from our initial consultation through to the end result.  

We aim to give you peace of mind at all stages of your claim no matter what the complexity.  With our successful record and cost-effective service, Damian McCarthy will have your back from start to finish. Unlike other employment law firms in London we pride ourselves on the fact that we achieve results, particularly in some very difficult cases.

If you are seeking employment law firms in London, Damian McCarthy are the only highly experienced professionals whom you need to contact. For more information or to speak to a member of our team at Damian McCarthy please call: 020 8263 6080.

Mother Suffered Discrimination after Part-Time Return From Maternity Leave

Many mothers resume work on a part-time basis after having children and employers must be very cautious to ensure that they are not subjected to any unfair detriment. In one case, a woman won the right to substantial compensation after her return to the office was blighted by less favourable treatment.

On returning from maternity leave, the software engineer had been made redundant after her manager reneged on an agreement that she would be permitted to leave at 5:00pm each day to pick up her child from nursery. A new role within the company that she could have applied for as an alternative to redundancy was subject to a requirement that she remain at work after 5:00pm.

After she launched proceedings, an Employment Tribunal (ET) found that she had suffered indirect sex discrimination, harassment and less favourable treatment as a part-time worker. Although the redundancy process was not a sham, the ET also ruled that her dismissal was unfair, having been tainted by discrimination.

In rejecting the company’s appeal against those findings, the Employment Appeal Tribunal could detect no flaw in the ET’s approach. The company’s challenge to a finding of direct sex discrimination – which related to an inappropriate comment allegedly made by a manager on hearing of the woman’s pregnancy – was, however, upheld. The reasoning in support of that finding was deficient and the issue was sent back to the same ET for reconsideration.

MPs Seek Maternity Discrimination Rights For New Mothers

The government is progressing with a detailed consultation to assess the various means by which employers might act in a discriminatory away against new mothers in the British workplace.

This investigation comes after a series of eighteen recommendations were put forward in August 2016 by MPs working as part of the government’s Women and Equalities committee. The goal is to establish safeguards that will protect new mothers against employer actions which might cause them to leave their position either through direct dismissal from an employer or as a result of unfair treatment that forces them to resign their position.

UK Business Minister Margot James has spoken about the importance of the consultation and the dedication the committee MPs have for it:

We are determined to tackle pregnancy and maternity discrimination and a key part of that is making sure new and expectant mothers are supported and treated fairly by their employers. There should be zero tolerance of discrimination against pregnant women, or women who have just given birth.”

Ms James has also stated how the discriminatory actions of bosses goes beyond harming new mothers to ultimately impacting upon UK businesses as a whole: “It is shocking that some employers still behave in this way and alienate a key group of their workforce. It makes no business sense.

The Women and Equalities committee has issued the results of several interviews that were conducted with new mothers to support its position. One anonymous woman claims a planned interview for a partnership position at a law firm was rejected once she returned to work after maternity leave. She subsequently left her position due to the discrimination she suffered.

Another woman, who also chose not to be named, saw her PR position get denied after she returned form maternity: “Before I fell pregnant, I had been asking about promotion opportunities, and possibilities were discussed with my manager […] On my return from maternity leave, I raised the issue of promotion again, and was told that if I wanted any hope of promotion, flexible working would make it very difficult.

Sufficient evidence proves that many working women feel too scared to voice their concern about maternity and pregnancy discrimination for fear they will be regarded as “trouble makers” should they do so, and that any such disclosure will have repercussions for their career as a result.

In total the amount of new and expectant mothers who claim to be forced from their jobs has doubled since 2005, to a total of 54,000.

The Women and Equalities committee seeks an all-encompassing protection for women that will include a “substantial” decrease in the existing £1,200 fee required for bringing a maternity convenience to tribunal.

An extension on the three month deadline for registering a claim is also sought, with the hope of doubling this period to six months. This comes despite government insistence that no evidence indicates an extended time frame will encourage more women to speak out.

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady believes that negotiating tribunal fee costs is vital for stopping pregnancy and maternity discrimination occuring: “Bad bosses will continue to get away with discriminating against new mums as long as it costs up to £1,200 to take a pregnancy discrimination claim […] My advice to women is to join a union […] pregnant women and new mums are treated better in workplaces that recognise trade unions.”